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The Dodo Blog

Soap In Wet Felting - How To Know If It's Enough

Nov 05, 2020
 

One of the questions I'm asked most often in my live classes is "is this enough soap?"

Felters who aren't very experienced are often unsure about how much soap to apply to their wool fibers. But there are a couple of clues that can help you avoid drowning your project in foam. And that's what I'll go into today.

Before I get into that, I'd like to say that the best way to avoid getting your project too soapy is to add soap slowly and only add more when you notice it’s not enough.

This is why using soapy water is not my preferred method of adding soap to the wool. I like adding water, getting my hands soapy first and only then applying it to the fibers. This way I have more control over how much soap is going into the wool. If you use this method, the tips I have for you today make much more sense.

You’ll know you have the right amount of soap when:

 

1. The wool doesn't stick to your hands.

When you’re applying soap with the method I mentioned above,...

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12 Tips For Nuno Felting – How To Hold Synthetic Decor With Nuno Felt

Jul 03, 2020
 

There are thousands of ways you can decorate a wet felted project. Some just involve wool, others can include silk or other fabrics, as you know. This is then called Nuno felting. But today I bring you a sample that contains wool, silk and something else.

I wanted to show you an example of how you can use a transparent piece of silk to hold any type of synthetic material, that wouldn’t otherwise attach to wool. In this case, I’ll be using a pre-felt and a piece of white silk chiffon with the same size as the pre-felt. Alternatively, you can lay merino wool tops or batts, and use light gauze instead of silk.

TIP # 1 – USE LIGHT GAUZE INSTEAD OF SILK TO MAKE YOUR EXPERIMENTS CHEAPER

I’m also using circles of a synthetic golden fabric (that doesn’t attach to wool), but you can choose countless other materials like small beads or sequins, for example.

If you’re making a sample, please remember to measure the size of the wool now and after shrinkage.

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How To Felt A Hat - The Classics

Apr 30, 2020
 

As I have been talking about for some time, I’m working on a masterclass about hats.

Deciding what hats to teach about was a hard task. It’s a topic that really allows you to explore your creativity. There’s no end to what you can do with felted hats. But I decided to go for the classics. I bet I’ll come back to the hats subject to explore it further, but the classics are a great way to start. They give you the basics that you can build upon later.

So, that means I’ve been working on the following hat types: the beret (of course), the cloche (also fundamental), the fedora (an imperative), the bowler and the floppy wide brim hat. I’m really excited about this masterclass and I’m having trouble keeping quiet about this

So, I wanted to show you some photos of the finished pieces.

One pattern, three hats

The Fedora

The Cloche

The Bowler

I’ve already filmed the part of the...

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How To Repair A Felted Bag With A Worn-Out Pattern

Nov 16, 2017
 

If you’ve been felting for some time, and you also use the pieces you felt, I’m sure you’ve already had this problem.

No matter how carefully you lay your wool or how resistant your piece has been felted, if you’re using it often, sooner or later its surface will be worn-out. And this is even more obvious if the piece has a pattern.

That’s normal. It’s just the way wool is.

That’s exactly what happened to this bag, that I’ve been using on a daily basis for the last 2 years.

But it’s a bag I really enjoy, so I decided to repair it. Now, as you know, it’s extremely difficult to make new fiber attach to the wool that’s already been densely felted.

Still, there is a solution, and that’s what I’ll be showing you in this video.

Hope you enjoy it!

P.S.: Do you have other ideas on how to repair felt? If so, you’re welcome to share them in the comments below.

 

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How To Recycle Felted Wool To Fill New Pieces

Oct 17, 2017
 

Today I’ve got a short video for you.

It’s on a subject that I haven’t heard anyone talk about yet: recycling felted wool rests.

It might not seem very important to you, if you’re just starting out with felting. But if it’s something you do on a regular basis, I bet you’ve already asked yourself what you should do with all those bits and pieces that you got from cutting parts off your projects or from items that just didn’t turn out the way you expected.

To me this is really something important. I work with high quality wool (with the certifications Öko-Tex® Standard 100 and Global Organic Textile Standard), so it would never cross my mind to throw away any rests. I keep every little bit, even the pieces my students don’t want to save, when I’m teaching live workshops ? This means I ended up with bags full of all shapes and colors, and I really wanted to do something with them.

When I started filming my latest felting...

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How To Make A Pre-Felt – Video Tutorial

Sep 06, 2017
 

I’ve been working in a new video workshop, which I hope to finish and post in the next couple of weeks. And the video tutorial I bring you today will be part of this workshop.

I wanted to share it with you, because I know there are so many questions about how to make a pre-felt.

Hope you enjoy it!

Talk to you soon!

 

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3 Easy Steps To Make A Resist For A Felted Cloche

Dec 15, 2016
 

Hello!

A couple of weeks ago, while I was teaching a workshop about hats in Lisbon, I promised to make a short PDF on how to determine the size of a resist for a felted hat, because that kind of information is easy to forget after some time.

I ended up getting carried away and making a video on the subject. So I wanted to share it with you as well. It’s a very short video workshop, that shows you how to make a resist in the right size for a wet felted cloche – in 3 easy steps:

  1. Measure the head
  2. Determine the shrinkage of the wool
  3. Draw the pattern and transfer it to the material for the resist.

If you’re looking for more details on how to determine the wool shrinkage, check out the video I made on it. And there’s also a lot more on the possible materials for a resist on another short online workshop.

I hope you enjoy these and share them with your creative friends!

You’ll probably be busy with all the preparations for Christmas and New Year’s...

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How To Make A Sample To Determine The Shrinkage

Dec 01, 2016
 

Hi there!

I´ve often been asked how do you make a sample to determine the shrinkage factor in wet felting. Well, that’s exactly what I’ll be covering in today’s video.

It’s actually very easy. You should make a sample, and measure it before and after felting.

There are three fundamental factors to take into account though:

  1. Use the same type (or types) of wool for your sample and project, since not all wool types have the same shrinkage.
  2. Use the same number of layers and equally thick ones for your sample and project, since the thickness of the layers influences the shrinkage.
  3. Felt the sample and your project to the same degree, since the more you felt, the more the piece will shrink.

Check out the video and let me know if I’ve covered all your questions!

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How Do I Know If My Felt Is Ready?

Nov 03, 2016
 

“How do I know if my felt is ready?” This is such a frequent question. And it’s answered in four words: do the pinch test!

And what’s the pinch test? When you feel your felt is solid enough not to fall apart anymore, you literally pinch the felt between your fingers to check if the fibers are still loose. If they’re not, it’s ready for fulling.

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The Right Way To Cut A Wool Top

Oct 26, 2016

Hi!

So many people are surprised to find out you shouldn’t cut felting wool with scissors. WHY? Well, a neat cut (like the one you get when cutting with scissors) makes it more difficult for the fibers to attach.

Here’s how to cut a wool top in a couple of seconds:

  • Hold your hands apart
  • Pull firmly
  • The wool will cut in the middle

Try it and let me know how it goes

cuttinf-a-wool-top-gif

 

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